Pakistan

Modern Art in Pakistan: History, Tradition, Place

Simone Wille
Routledge
2015

Revisiting 1947 through Popular Cinema: A Comparative Study of India and Pakistan

Author(s): 
Gita Viswanath
Salma Malik
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Economic & Political Weekly
www.epw.in/journal/2009/36/special-articles/revisiting-1947-through-popular-cinema-comparative-study-india-and

The memorialisation of the Partition of the Indian subcontinent in 1947 through popular cinema is the theme of this paper. Both in India and Pakistan, cinema as a cultural production wields immense influence in the lives of the people and mainstream cinema has been deeply affected by Partition.

Bureaucracy and Border Control: Crime, Police Reform and National Security in Kutch, 1948–52

Author(s): 
Farhana Ibrahim
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Economic & Political Weekly
www.epw.in/journal/2017/15/exploring-borderlands-south-asia/bureaucracy-and-border-control.html

Studies on militarisation and borders in South Asia have often remained focused on zones of spectacular conflict such as Kashmir, or Punjab during the partition. This article tracks the production of a discourse on borders by those charged with border security such as the police and other senior bureaucracy in the decades following the partition.

End of the Postcolonial State

Author(s): 
Faisal Devji
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Economic & Political Weekly
www.epw.in/journal/2021/44/50-years-liberation-bangladesh/end-postcolonial-state.html

Much of the scholarship on Bangladesh’s founding places it within a narrative of repetition. It either repeats the partitions of 1905 or 1947 or the creation of India and Pakistan as postcolonial states. This paper argues instead for the novelty of Bangladesh’s creation against the postcolonial state, suggesting that it opened up a new history at the global level in which decolonisation was replaced by civil war as the founding narrative for new states.

India, Pakistan, and a History of Water Sharing: Revisiting the Indus Water Treaty

Author(s): 
EPW Engage
Publisher/Sponsor: 
EPW Engage
www.epw.in/engage/article/india-pakistan-indus-water-treaty

Legal and political considerations make flouting the Indus Water Treaty easier said than done.

Interpreting the Legacy of Partition in the Subcontinent: India and Pakistani Perspective

Author(s): 
Shantanu Chakrabarti
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Księgarnia Akademicka
https://www.jstor.org/stable/24920193

Politeja - No. 40, MODERN SOUTH ASIA: A SPACE OF INTERCULTURAL DIALOGUE (2016), pp. 21-30 (10 pages)

Deadly Impasse: Indo-Pakistani Relations at the Dawn of a New Century

Sumit Ganguly
Cambridge University Press
2016

Women and the Pakistan International Airlines in Ayub Khan’s Pakistan

Dr Pippa Virdee
The International History Review
2018

Visual culture and violence: inventing intimacy and citizenship in recent South Asian cinema

Author(s): 
Kavita Daiya
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Taylor and Francis Online
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19472498.2011.605301

The 1947 Partition of India has recently re-emerged as a thematic concern of many South Asian films about nationalism in popular and parallel cinema. These films invoke the 1947 Partition in both productive and troubling ways: they connect it to the contemplation of the role of religion in the contemporary nation-state, and of the impact of religious ethnicity, terrorism and gender on the experience of citizenship in both India and Pakistan.

Citizenship and Social Belonging Across the Thar: Gender, Family and Caste in the Context of the 1971 War

Author(s): 
Farhana Ibrahim
Publisher/Sponsor: 
Taylor and Francis Online
www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03068374.2022.2078082

In this article, I examine the 1971 war (better known as the war for the liberation of Bangladesh) from a western Indian perspective. I argue that this war between India and Pakistan—while it focused overtly on the independence of East Pakistan—had some significant consequences for the western border between Kutch (in Gujarat state) and Sindh (in Pakistan).

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